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107mm B-11



Overview


107mm B-11

Soviet produced 107mm B-11 recoilless rifle on display at the Polish army museum.
Source: Zala - © CC BY-SA 4.0

Origin
Soviet Union
Type
Recoilless rifle
Entered service
1954
Status
Limited service
Development
Early 1950's
Developer
Soviet Union - KBM Kolomna
Production
1954 - 1964
Producer
Soviet Union - TOZ
Number produced
Produced in large numbers
Designations
52-M-883 (GRAU index)
RG107 | Rückstoßfreie Geschütz 107 (East German service)
Notable users
Soviet Union

Description


Introduction

The B-11 is an early Cold War era recoilless rifle of Soviet origin. It was developed in the early 1950's for used by motorized infantry and airborne troops. It is a dual role weapon intended for both anti-tank use and engaging infantry positions and crew served weapons.

Design

The B-11 is an up-scaled version of the 82mm B-10 recoilless rifle. The larger caliber makes for a more potent shaped charge warhead and extends the practical range. Furthermore it fires a larger shell in the indirect fire mode. The B-11 is a breech loaded weapon that is normally fired from its tripod. A direct fire and indirect fire sight are fitted.

Firepower

The BK-883 HEAT round has an effective range of about 450 meters and penetrates about 380 mm RHA. This was enough to penetrate contemporary tanks, making it a far more reliable anti-tank weapon than the smaller caliber SPG-82 or B-10 recoilless rifles. For indirect fire the O-883 HE-fragmentation shell is used. This can be fired out to 6.65 km but with limited accuracy. It proved more useful in the stand-off engagement of infantry positions where the gun crew of the B-11 has line of sight.

Mobility

The B-11 has two road wheels and can be towed behind a vehicle. These include the GAZ-69 4x4 light truck and ZiS-151 and ZiL-157 6x6 medium trucks. These vehicles also transport the crew and the ammunition. A towing eye on the muzzle allows it to be quickly attached to a towing vehicle. It takes about a minute to set up the B-11 on its tripod. In an emergency it can be fired of its wheels with reduced effectiveness. The crew can manhandle the B-11 over short distances in the field. It can also be disassembled in three major parts for transportation by pack animals.

Users

The B-11 was adopted in quantity in Soviet service for use by motorized infantry and VDV airborne forces. After about a decade it was being replaced in service by anti-tank guided missiles for the anti-tank role and by howitzers such as the D-30 for more effective indirect fire. The B-11 was exported to various Warsaw Pact nations and Soviet allies. Small numbers remain in service in third world nations and conflict areas today.

Details


Facts B-11
General
Origin
Soviet Union
Type
Recoilless rifle
Crew
3 to 5
Dimensions
Weight
304.8 in total
128 kg barrel
101 kg tripod
37 kg per wheel assembly
2.3 kg PBO-4 sight unit
Length
3.56 m
Width
1.45 m
Height
0.9 m in travel configuration
1.19 m in firing position
Ordnance
Type
107mm smoothbore
Barrel length
3.38 m
Muzzle brake
No
Muzzle velocity
381 m/s for BK-883 HEAT
Elevation
-10° to +45°
Traverse
35° left to 35° right
Fire control
Sights
PBO-4 sight unit
3x with 18° field of view for direct fire
2.5x with 9° field of view for indirect fire
Firepower
Rate of fire
5 to 6 rpm
Range
0.45 km practical for BK-883 HEAT
1.4 km maximum for BK-883 HEAT
6.65 km for O-883A HE-fragmentation
Carriage
Type
Fixed two wheel carriage
Limber
No, towing eye on muzzle
Gun shield
No
Tread
1.25 m
Ground clearance
0.32 m
Emplacement time
1 minute
Mobility
Towing vehicle
GAZ-69, ZiS-151 or ZiL-157 truck
To be carried internally over long distance travel
Autonomous mobility
Can be moved by crew over short distances

Media


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106mm M40

The M40 Recoilless Rifle can be considered the American counterpart of the B-11. It has a roughly similar size and performance but weighs less.