Cookie Consent by Privacy Policies Generator

Simonov SKS


China: Type 56


Overview


Simonov SKS

Right side view of Soviet produced SKS with folding blade bayonet.
Source: Swedish Army Museum - © GNU Attribution Share Alike license

Origin
Soviet Union
Type
Self-loading rifle
Entered service
1949
Status
Obsolete
Development
1945 - 1949
Developer
Soviet Union
Sergei Gavrilovich Simonov
Production
1949 - 1955 (SKS in the USSR)
1965 - 1971 (Type 56 in China)
Producer
Soviet Union - Izhmash
Soviet Union - TOZ
Number produced
About 15 million SKS and comparable models have been produced.
Designations
Type 56 (Chinese production)
Karabiner S (East Germany)
karabin samopowtarzalny Simonova / ksS (Poland)
M59 (Yugoslavia)
Type 1 (Vietnam)

Description


Introduction

The SKS is an early Cold War era self loading rifle of Soviet origin. It was developed during the later stages of World War 2 as a lighter and more compact alternative to the Mosin-Nagant and SVT-40 rifles. Eventually the SKS got replaced by the AKM. Still, millions of SKS were produced and it was a common weapon in all nations using Soviet small arms.

Design

The SKS combines design features from the AVS-36 and SVT-40 self-loading rifles. The SKS has a conventional carbine layout. Externally it looks like a shortened SVT-40 rifle. The stock and furniture are made out of wood. It uses a short stroke gas piston and a tilting bolt. The SKS is fitted with a folding blade or spike bayonet.

Firepower

The SKS is a semi-automatic rifle. It fires the intermediate power 7.62x39mm round from a fixed 10 round magazine. It is reloaded using 10 round stripper clips. Practical effective range is about 300 meters. The SKS is not able to launch rifle grenades.

Users

The first user of the SKS was the USSR. When it became apparent that in practice the AK-47 was a more potent weapon and in its stamped receiver AKM form could be produced a low enough cost. Many SKS rifles were exported or produced in states with ties to the USSR. China produced large numbers of their SKS, the Type 56. Today most SKS are obsolete or relegated to second line units. In many armies the AK-47 series of assault rifles replaced the SKS.

Details


Facts SKS
General
Origin
Soviet Union
Type
Self-loading rifle
Caliber
Caliber
7.62x39mm Soviet
Feed system
10 round fixed magazine
10 round stripper clips
Barrel length
521 mm
Rifling
4 grooves, right hand twist
Muzzle velocity
735 m/s
Operation
Action
Gas operated, short stroke gas piston
Locking
Tilting bolt
Fire selector
0 - 1
Rate of fire
Semi-automatic
Dimensions
Stock type
Fixed
Length
1.021 mm
1.26 m with bayonet
Weight
3.8 kg
Sights
Mechanical
Iron sights, hooded post front and tangent notch rear
Range adjustment
100 to 1.000 m
Accessories
Bayonet
Yes

Variants


Type 56

PLA Navy with Type 56 rifles in 2000.
Source: US Navy - © public domain

List of foreign production models

Type 56
Chinese production model. Early models have a Soviet style blade bayonet. Later models have a spike bayonet.
M59
Yugoslav production model. Direct copy of the SKS.
M59/66
Yugoslav variant with ability to launch NATO standard rifle grenades. Features a different muzzle and folding leaf sight.
M56
Romanian production model. Similar to late production Soviet SKS.
Type 1
Vietnamese production model, similar to Soviet SKS and Chinese Type 56.
Type 63
North Korean production model. Several styles of bayonet were produced. A grenade launching variant was also developed.
Karabiner S
East German production model. Very similar to the Soviet model.
10th of July
Albanian production model, produced from 1967 to 1878. Similar to late model Type 56 with spike bayonet mixed with some features found on Type 63 rifles.

Media


Related articles


Kalashnikov AKM

In Soviet service the SKS was replaced by the AKM series of assault rifles, firing the same 7.62x39mm round.

Tokarev SVT-40

The Tokarev SVT-40 was one of the designs that influenced the development of the SKS.